20th Century Changes

Over the course of the century, the intake of Chailey Heritage pupils changed and their range of needs changed accordingly. In the early days, most of the children had orthopaedic conditions. This was followed by the polio epidemic which led to new problems including paralysis. Some of the first wheelchair-users at Chailey had been affected by spina bifida.

In the 1960s, the Thalidamide drug, used in pregnancy to prevent morning sickness, caused a generation of children to be born limbless. By the latter end of the century, as mainstream and special schools adapted their provision to help children with disabilities, Chailey Heritage went on to cater for those with the most complex physical disabilities and high health needs.

Late 20th Century pupils

And so, Chailey Heritage has continually adapted to ensure help is provided where it is needed most.

Please click the pictures below to find out more

Our History

Our History

Founded in 1903 by a young lady called Grace Kimmins who was passionate about creating a future for chidren with disabilities.

World Wars

World Wars

A hospital for injured servicemen and blitzed babies was just one of the ways our services have been 'multi-purpose' over the years...

Old Scholars

Old Scholars

Despite having long moved on from their school days, many of our ex-pupils remain in contact and visit us on the annual 'Old Scholars' Day'.

Our Founder

Our Founder

This piece was written by our President, Verena Hanbury, MBE DL, Granddaughter of Dame Grace Kimmins.

 

Working in partnership with

Chailey Heritage Foundation works in partnership with Chailey Clinical Services, part of Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust. They provide medical intervention, clinical expertise and a range of therapies on-site for our children, young people and young adults.

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